Add A New Hypothesis




 

 

Hypotheses

 

Infectious Diseases, Cancer Biology Testable & falsifiable Guest 0 / User 0



In humans and the great apes, uric acid is the end product of purine degradation, whereas in other mammals including pigs, it is further degraded into allantoin by uricase, an enzyme that is mostly found in the liver. Uricase enzyme is non-functional in humans due to missense mutation in the gene. Allantoin is more soluble in water than uric acid. Therefore, the claim that pig muscles contain high amount of urine (uric acid) is a matter of debate. May be, it is the allantoin that is deposited in the muscles in case of hyperuricemia. This hypothesis can be further testing by experimental analyses.


Author
    Ops, nothing to show!

 

Infectious Diseases, Cancer Biology Testable & falsifiable Guest 0 / User 0



Muscles of animals and humans share the same amino acid components. However, certain biomarker peptides identified by a shotgun proteomic approach using tryptic digests of protein extracts, can be used for the detection of trace contaminations of pork.


Author

 

Infectious Diseases, Cancer Biology Testable & falsifiable Guest 0 / User 0



An omega-6 to omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) ratio that is too high may contribute to excess inflammation in the body, potentially raising the risk of various diseases such as cardiovascular disease, autoimmune diseases, and cancers. The ratio today is 16:1. It has been found that the total fatty acid concentration of pork meat is higher than that of beef. Also, pork has higher concentrations of n-6 fatty acids while there is higher concentrations of n-3 fatty acids in lamb. It has been noted that the n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio obtained in pork is in the range of 6 to 23, which was much higher than (<5:1) recommended by the WHO/FAO. However, other food products such as roasted chicken thigh, peanut butter, walnuts, safflower oil, certain fast food products and snacks have much higher concentration of n-6 fatty acids than pork. It remains unclear whether a high intake of omega-6 fatty acids from pork is responsible for the side effects. This hypothesis is open to questions and needs further investigation.


Author

 

Infectious Diseases, Cancer Biology Testable & falsifiable Guest 0 / User 0



Transplantation of skin grafts from pigs to human can result in the transfer of infectious pathogens to humans. But, this could be reduced by rearing and monitoring of pigs under the regulated conditions as well as routine screening for microbiologic and parasitic burden.


Author

 

Nanotechnology and Regenerative Medicine Testable & falsifiable Guest 0 / User 0



Pigmeat can be a source of major human parasitic infections, and some can be deadly. Still, if proper measures are taken the infection can be prevented easily.


Author

 

Infectious Diseases, Cancer Biology Testable & falsifiable Guest 0 / User 0



There is little evidence for an association between the risk of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and either animal exposure, or consumption of processed meat. Therefore, prions transmission from pig meat to humans is minimal. Still, this area needs further investigation.


Author

 

Infectious Diseases, Cancer Biology Testable & falsifiable Guest 0 / User 0



The World Health Organisation has warned that antibiotic use in pigs can spread to humans through consumption of pork and impact on human immune systems. Statistics indicate that between 1970 and 2000, the majority of pig diets contained antimicrobial agents. The increase in resistance of Gram-negative bacteria is faster than that in Gram-positive bacteria. A high occurrence of resistance in the intestinal flora of food-producing animals increase the risk that resistant bacteria are passed on in the food chain. This also implies the potential danger of transmission of resistance genes from animal bacteria to human bacteria through horizontal gene transfer. Excessive use of antibiotics in pork can lead to the growth of ‘superbugs’ in humans, which are resistant to most of the available antibiotics. New pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Clostridium difficile, tetracycline-resistant E. coli can act as a potential vehicle of transmission of resistance genes.


Author

 

Infectious Diseases, Cancer Biology Testable & falsifiable Guest 0 / User 0



African swine fever is a viral disease of pigs and wild boar that is usually deadly. Past experiences have shown that viruses affecting pigs have undergone series of mutations to become capable of infecting human population. If we take into account the fact that pig physiology is very close to human physiology, and they suffer illness in almost the same way as we do, there is reason to believe that in the next round of mutation the virus can become dangerous to humans. Additionally, pigs who are co-infected with several strains of the same virus may act as mixing reservoir for these viruses, ensuing in the emergence of a more virulent strain that may cause an epidemic.


Author

 

Infectious Diseases, Cancer Biology Testable & falsifiable Guest 0 / User 0



Pigs are an important reservoir of Toxoplasma gondii, and pork meat is considered one of the main sources of human infection. Toxoplasma gondii is a cosmopolitan zoonotic protozoan parasite, and the ingestion of viable cysts from infected raw or undercooked meat is an important route of horizontal transmission of the parasite to humans. It has been noted that the cysts of this parasite remained viably infective even after low temperature cooking, a process done for tenderizing pork meat. Raw-fermented sausage, home-produced cured raw meat, meat that is not hot-air dried, and fresh processed meat may, therefore, be associated with higher exposure risks compared with cooked meat and frozen meat. Moreover, the parasite may be present in carcass, fecal matter that may result in direct transmission of the parasite to humans. Moreover, T. gondii tissue cysts have a high pH tolerance. Consequently, dry salami-type meat products that are preserved by lactic acid bacterial fermentation, and are not cooked in their preparation, are more likely to be infected with the cysts.


Author

Showing 1-9 of 9 items.